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The Nature of Things Rebellion

Sparked by activist Greta Thunberg in Sweden and exploding around the world, the global climate protests have been some of the largest demonstrations in history. Rebellion is a vivid portrait of this extraordinary grassroots movement.
  • 2020
  • 00:44:08
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/20/2021

CBC Radio One The Legend of Nanabozho

A beautiful woman is pushed off the moon and falls into a lake on Earth. There, people greet her, build her a wigwam, and seek out her advice. This is the story of Nokomis, her daughter Winona, and Winona's son Nanabozho. It's one of thousands of legends Indigenous peoples in Canada have passed down the generations to tell stories about ...
  • 1971
  • 00:27:02
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/16/2021

The National Open for Business

A look at the Free Trade agreement on the eve of its 10th anniversary. How was the 1988 deal put together, what did Canada get and what did we give up? This report includes clips and discussions with the major players in the process, including former prime ministers Brian Mulroney and John Turner. It also looks at the proposed Multilateral Agreement ...
  • 1997
  • 00:35:59
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/15/2021

The Nature of Things Kids vs. Screens

Babies can scroll before they can crawl. Many kids can’t read a map, but they can navigate an iPad. But how are screens affecting children's development, learning abilities and mental health?
  • 2020
  • 00:44:08
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 04/13/2021

Unreserved Cultural Appropriation vs. Cultural Appreciation

It's almost Halloween, have you picked a costume yet? It seems like every year certain costumes get everyone talking, so with that in mind, here's how we can all do a little more appreciating and a little less appropriating.
  • 2016
  • 00:03:38
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/29/2021

When I Worry About Things Being a bully: Ariana's story

This clip uses the real first-person testimony from Ariana, a young Albanian girl whose family valued boys higher than girls, to create an intimate and direct tone. The open and honest narration will help students develop a sense of empathy with her and recognize the parallels with their own lives. In the film, Ariana relates how her family background led ...
  • 2016
  • 00:04:29
  • 9-12
  • Added on: 03/24/2021

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BBC Bitesize How computers have changed

Computers are everywhere today and they can do things very fast. In the past they were much slower and much bigger. Computers have changed a lot over time. There have been some important people who have helped change what computers can do. They include Charles Babbage, Ada Lovelace and Alan Turing, who are featured in this video.
  • 2017
  • 00:01:16
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 03/23/2021

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Religions of the World The Jewish story of Moses

This film focuses on Judaism. It narrates the story of Moses as he grows up watching the Jewish people enslaved and follows him as he leads his people to freedom, through the Red Sea to their promised land.
  • 2016
  • 00:04:04
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 03/22/2021

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Religions of the World Sikh stories

This film focuses on Sikhism and features the stories of The Milk & The Jasmine Flower and Duni Chand & the Silver Needle. Guru Nanak shows the townspeople there is always room in the world for more holiness, and that only good deeds go with us to the next world, not money and gold.
  • 2016
  • 00:03:25
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 03/18/2021

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CBC Docs POV To the Worlds

Each of these women are growing older (some older than others!), but that won't stop them from competing in an international figure skating competition, or having a lot of fun along the way.
  • 2019
  • 00:44:04
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/18/2021

Religions of the World The Hindu story of Rama and Sita

Rama and Sita is one of the main stories from Hinduism. This story is connected with Diwali - the annual festival of light held every autumn. It is about Rama rescuing Sita from the demon King Ravana with the help of Hanuman and his monkey army.
  • 2016
  • 00:04:57
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 03/16/2021

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Religions of the World The Five Pillars of Islam

This film focuses on Islam and follows Amina as she explains the Five Pillars of Islam (Shahadah, Salah, Zakah, Sawm and Hajj) to her little brother Rahib.
  • 2016
  • 00:03:36
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 03/16/2021

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Religions of the World The Buddhist story of Siddhartha and the Swan and The Monkey King

This film focuses on Buddhism, and narrates two Buddhist stories - the story of Siddhartha rescuing the hurt swan, and of the Monkey King showing the greedy human king the importance of caring for his people.
  • 2016
  • 00:04:19
  • 5-8
  • Added on: 03/16/2021

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News in Review - March 2021 Women of Influence: Kamala Harris and Amanda Gorman

In January 2021, Kamala Harris became the highest-ranking woman in U.S. history when she was sworn in as the first female vice-president — and the first Black woman and person of South Asian descent to hold the position. Born in California, Harris has ties to Canada having attended high school in Montreal. Another exciting voice heard at the U.S. presidential ...
  • 2021
  • 00:14:56
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/12/2021

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News in Review - March 2021 Gender Inequality: The Pandemic's Impact on Women

During the COVID-19 pandemic, one of the groups that has been disproportionately affected is women. Women tend to be the majority of workers in front-facing service jobs. When COVID-19 hit, many of those jobs disappeared. Also, women still bear more of the responsibility for childcare and household management, resulting in many leaving the workforce as schools and daycares shuttered. Statistics ...
  • 2021
  • 00:16:40
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/12/2021

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News in Review - February 2021 Republic in Peril: The Storming of the U.S. Capitol

On January 6, 2021, an angry mob of rioters, incited by the President of the United States, stormed the Capitol Building in Washington D.C. and smashed their way in. Hundreds of these insurgents looted the building, threatened politicians and took selfies. Five people died as a result, including one rioter and a police officer. President Donald Trump would stand accused ...
  • 2021
  • 00:20:17
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/12/2021

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News in Review - February 2021 Rewind: The Stories that Made 2020

COVID-19 is the story that everyone will remember from 2020. But there were many other important headline stories that happened in 2020, starting in January when Ukraine Flight 752 was shot down during takeoff from Tehran by an Iranian surface-to-air missile. The year also saw Canada’s largest mass shooting when 22 people were killed by a gunman in Nova Scotia. ...
  • 2021
  • 00:15:57
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 03/12/2021

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Library and Archives Canada Tom Longboat is Cogwagee is Everything

In the early 20th century, no spectator sport captivated the world like long distance running. And no runner captured the hearts of Canadians like a Six Nations Indigenous man by the name of Cogwagee in the Onondaga language, or Tom Longboat in English. From his victory at the 1907 Boston Marathon, where he shattered the previous world record by five ...
  • 2019
  • 01:03:37
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/22/2021

Library and Archives Canada Mackenzie King: Against his Will

William Lyon Mackenzie King was Canada’s longest serving prime minister, an accomplished politician and a prolific writer. He kept an ongoing diary from 1893, until a few days before his death in 1950, in which he wrote down meticulous accounts of his life in politics and fascinating details from his private life. This episode features professor and author Christopher Dummitt, ...
  • 2018
  • 01:01:00
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/22/2021

Library and Archives Canada Bill Miner: Last of the Old Time Bandits

On May 8, 1906, three armed and masked men held up the Canadian Pacific Railway’s Transcontinental Express at a place called Duck’s Station, 17 miles east of Kamloops in British Columbia. It was a botched robbery to say the least. The bandits ordered the engine and mail car uncoupled, and moved the train a mile down the track. Realizing that ...
  • 2019
  • 01:04:40
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/22/2021

Library and Archives Canada Francis Mackey and the Halifax Explosion

On the morning of December 6, 1917, Pilot Francis Mackey was guiding the French ship Mont Blanc into the Bedford Basin when, at the narrowest point of the harbour, the Norwegian ship Imo collided with it. The Mont Blanc, laden down with high explosives, caught fire and, about 20 minutes later, exploded. The blast, which was the greatest man-made explosion ...
  • 2019
  • 01:08:00
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/20/2021

Library and Archives Canada La Bolduc: Queen of Canadian Folksingers

In this episode Library and Archives Canada’s Music Historian and Archivist Rachel Chiasson-Taylor discusses Mary Travers Bolduc, a traditional housewife who became known as the “Queen of Canadian Folksingers.” Find out how and why her career, which began out of simple economic necessity and, building on the music of her own roots, became the stuff of legend.
  • 2016
  • 00:34:34
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/19/2021

Library and Archives Canada In Flanders Fields: A Century of Poppies

The poem In Flanders Fields — which is over 100 years old — is considered to be the most popular poem from the First World War. This episode features archivist Emily Monks-Leeson from Library and Archives Canada who will guide us through the life of John McCrae, the Canadian soldier who penned the poem. She will help us understand the conditions from ...
  • 2015
  • 00:35:27
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/19/2021

Library and Archives Canada Canada's Flag: The Maple Leaf Forever

Canada's flag, with its distinctive maple leaf and bold red-and-white colour scheme has become such a potent symbol for our country that it’s hard to believe it has only been around for 50 years. On February 15, 1965, the new flag flew for the first time on Parliament Hill for all to see, but unveiling the new design was anything ...
  • 2015
  • 00:33:17
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/19/2021

Library and Archives Canada Let us be Canadians: Sir John A. Macdonald

While some aspects of John A. Macdonald's life and legacy remain contentious, most agree that his role in the creation of Canada was paramount. In this episode the Library and Archives Canada (LAC) team explores the life and career of Macdonald with award-winning journalist-historian Arthur Milnes as guide. Also featured is LAC art archivist and curator Madeleine Trudeau, who speaks ...
  • 2015
  • 00:37:45
  • 13-14
  • Added on: 02/19/2021